cover

Service Blueprint

Help the team understand the technological and human interactions that take place in a customer journey

Phases
  • Discovery
Suggested Time

1 - 2 hours

Participants

Core team, stakeholders


Why do it?

  • To help everyone understand the touch points in the experience
  • To serve as a map of your service over time
  • To get an overview of all interactions, systems and integration points that support the user journey
  • To help improve a user’s journey by uncovering problematic areas in time

When to do it?

Early in Discovery or when anyone has difficulty expressing a workflow

What supplies are needed?

  • Whiteboard or digital version like Miro
  • Markers
  • Sticky notes

How to Use this Method

Sample Agenda & Prompts

  1. Draw these rows on the whiteboard:

    Row NameSteps 1 to n
    Physical Evidence?
    Customer Actions?
    Frontstage?
    Backstage - eg. services, databases?
    <Any other points, eg. sensors>?

    The customer/user actions row is always directly under physical evidence row. It is the user we are targeting; they are the “hero”.

    Tip: All projects/products are different, so you can always add different rows to the table as needed. See “Facilitator Notes & Tips” for a list possibilities.

  2. Move column by column through time, filling in cells with:

    Physical Evidence — What does the user first see? The physical evidence is not the interface they see, it is a monitor or cell phone.

    Customer Actions — What action do they do to access the service? What do they do next?

    Frontstage — How is the service visibly delivered? When a service is delivered, what is the name of the page that the user sees?

    Backstage — What helps make the service happen? The user does not see or directly interact with this.

    Other touch-points — What needs to happen in order for the backend to receive the information?

  3. Circle or star cells that:

    • Need more clarity through research and exploration
    • Need validation because there’s product risk
    • Are pain points which should be fixed or improved
    • Are opportunities to measure the quality of the service
    • Are opportunities for cost savings or increased profits
    • Are moments that are loved by the customer and should not be lost

Success/Expected Outcomes

You’ve succeeded when everyone has a shared understanding of the entire workflow and the areas that have the most pain

Facilitator Notes & Tips

Compared to a journey map, service blueprints focus more on the process than the customer experience.

Service blueprints are especially useful for:

  • Multiple interactions spread over time (closing and re-opening an app)
  • Many mediums of interaction, controlling physical products, customer service

Optional rows

  • Time - some services are provided at different times or have steps that take varying amounts of time to complete
  • Thoughts/Emotions - understanding emotions of fear/anxiety provides context to customer decisions
  • Phases - services can unfold over time; e.g. rent, use, return
  • Split up Backstage - breaking backend technology into Employees, Data, Apps, Infrastructure, Name of Dept/Team can clarify various domains of the service
  • Photos / Sketches - the team can visualize a step using pictures or drawings
  • Challenges - the team can discuss difficulties within the existing process
  • Ideas - the team can generate solutions that solve pains

Optional lines to draw between rows

  • The line of interaction - this is the point at which customers and the service interact
  • The line of visibility - beyond this line, the customer can no longer see into the service
  • The line of internal interaction - this is where the business itself stops, and partners step in

Variations

None at the moment

Preceding

None at the moment

Following

None at the moment

Real World Examples

Coming soon!

Service Blueprints: Laying the Foundation by Izac Ross of Cooper