Getting Started with Tanzu GemFire for Kubernetes

This guide walks you through creating and testing a Tanzu GemFire cluster on Kubernetes using a Hello, World! client application.

Before you start!

This guide assumes that the Tanzu GemFire Operator has been installed in your Kubernetes cluster.

In order to create a GemFire cluster, you will need a Tanzu Net account, in order to pull the image from the registry.

You will also need permission to use kubectl.

Create A Tanzu GemFire Cluster

  1. Verify that you are in the Kubernetes cluster you want to use for Tanzu GemFire

    kubectl config current-context
    
  2. Create a namespace for the Tanzu GemFire cluster (We use the creative namespace name of tanzu-gemfire for this example)

    kubectl create namespace tanzu-gemfire
    
  3. Create an image pull secret that will be used to pull down the Tanzu GemFire images needed to create the cluster

    $ kubectl create secret docker-registry image-pull-secret --namespace=tanzu-gemfire --docker-server=registry.tanzu.vmware.com --docker-username='TANZU NET USERNAME' --docker-password='TANZU NET PASSWD'
    
    • Replace tanzu-gemfire with the name of your namespace, if different.
    • Replace TANZU NET USERNAME with your Tanzu Net Username
    • Replace TANZU NET PASSWD with your Tanzu Net Password
  4. Create your Tanzu GemFire CRD file.

    Below is a simple yaml file that will create a Tanzu GemFire cluster named hello-world-gemfire-cluster with 1 locator and 2 servers. Save this as a YAML file in your current working directory.

apiVersion: gemfire.tanzu.vmware.com/v1
kind: GemFireCluster
metadata:
   name: hello-world-gemfire-cluster
spec:
  image: registry.tanzu.vmware.com/pivotal-gemfire/vmware-gemfire:9.15.1
  security:
    tls: {}

For the full list of GemFire CRD configuration options and explanations check out the Tanzu GemFire Customer Resource Definition template.

  1. Apply your Tanzu GemFire CRD YAML from Step 4 to create the Tanzu GemFire cluster

    kubectl --namespace=tanzu-gemfire apply -f CLUSTER-CRD-YAML
    
    • Replace tanzu-gemfire with the name of your namespace, if it’s different.
    • Replace CLUSTER-CRD-YAML with the name of the yaml file you created.
  2. If successful you should see in your terminal

    gemfirecluster.gemfire.tanzu.vmware.com/hello-world-gemfire-cluster created

  3. Confirm that Tanzu GemFire is up and ready to use

    kubectl --namespace=tanzu-gemfire get GemFireClusters
    
    • Replace tanzu-gemfire with the name of your namespace, if it’s different.

    When the cluster is ready to use the output should look similar to

    NAME                          LOCATORS   SERVERS
    hello-world-gemfire-cluster   1/1        2/2
    

    Where the NAME will be the value you have for the name entry in your CRD file from Step 4 .


Run a Spring Boot for Apache Geode app on Kubernetes

This section will guide you through testing a Hello, World! client application, that utilizes Spring Boot for Apache Geode.

What You’ll Need

  • The Hello, World! example.
  • JDK 8 or 11
  • Spring Boot 2.3 or above
  • Spring Boot for Apache Geode 1.3 or above
  • A running Tanzu GemFire cluster on Kubernetes
  • Docker installed
  • An image repository for the Hello, World! example.

1. Download the Hello, World! Example

Clone the Hello, World! app from the examples repo.

$ git clone https://github.com/gemfire/spring-for-apache-geode-examples.git

2. Edit the application.properties File

  • Navigate to the spring-for-apache-geode-examples/hello-world directory.

  • Open the application.properties.

  • Uncomment the two listed properties.

  • Replace the value for spring.data.gemfire.pool.locators: with your Tanzu GemFire cluster information, for each locator (in this example we only have one locator). The information will follow the form:

    [GEMFIRE-CLUSTER-NAME]-locator-[LOCATOR-NUMBER].[GEMFIRE-CLUSTER-NAME]-locator.[NAMESPACE-NAME][10334]
    

    For our example the value looks like this:

    spring.data.gemfire.pool.locators: hello-world-gemfire-cluster-locator-0.hello-world-gemfire-cluster-locator.tanzu-gemfire[10334]
    
  • Replace the value for spring.data.gemfire.management.http.host: with your Tanzu GemFire cluster information. This will allow Spring Boot for Apache Geode to push your initial cluster configuration to GemFire. The information follows a similar form as above:

    [GEMFIRE-CLUSTER-NAME]-locator-[LOCATOR-NUMBER].[GEMFIRE-CLUSTER-NAME]-locator.[NAMESPACE-NAME][GEMFIRE LOCATOR PORT]
    

    For our example the value looks like this:

     spring.data.gemfire.management.http.host: hello-world-gemfire-cluster-locator-0.hello-world-gemfire-cluster-locator.tanzu-gemfire
    

3. Build a Docker Image with Gradle or Maven

Starting with Spring Boot 2.3, you can now customize and create an OCI image using Spring Boot. In this example we’re using the Gradle - packaging OCI images option. If you are using Maven check out the instructions found here.

  • In a terminal, navigate to the hello-world directory.
  • Build the application with ./gradlew clean build
  • Open the build.gradle file and update the bootBuildImage section, with your Docker repository information. This will build an image with the name docker.io/[docker username]/hello-world:0.0.1-SNAPSHOT.
  • Build the image with ./gradlew bootBuildImage

4. Push your Docker Image to Docker Hub

For this example, we’re using Docker Hub as our registry. This will create a repository on Docker Hub called hello-world and push the image we created into that repository.

In a terminal

  • Login to your Docker account

  • Run the docker push [IMAGE NAME HERE]. For this example it should be similar to this

    docker push docker.io/[YOUR DOCKER USERNAME]/hello-world:0.0.1-SNAPSHOT
    

5. Create a deployment in your Kubernetes cluster

Create a Kubernetes deployment for your Hello, World! app. This will create a deployment, replicaset, and pod using the hello-world image we created above.

  kubectl --namespace=tanzu-gemfire create deployment hello-world-deployment --image=docker.io/[YOUR DOCKER USERNAME]/hello-world:0.0.1-SNAPSHOT

If successful you should see deployment.apps/hello-world-deployment created

6. Create a LoadBalancer to access the app

In order to access Hello, World! app from a browser, we need to expose the deployment.

kubectl --namespace=tanzu-gemfire expose deployment/hello-world-deployment --type="LoadBalancer" --port=80 --target-port=8080

If you’re trying this locally with MiniKube, you will need to replace LoadBalancer with NodePort.

7. Access the Hello, World! Application

Once the Load Balancer has been created, you can now access the Hello, World! application using the External IP on the LoadBalancer service.

kubectl -n tanzu-gemfire get services

This should output something similar to

NAME                                  TYPE           CLUSTER-IP     EXTERNAL-IP    PORT(S)              AGE
hello-world-deployment                LoadBalancer   10.0.227.199   20.62.226.18   80:31350/TCP         57s
hello-world-gemfire-cluster-locator   ClusterIP      None           <none>         10334/TCP,4321/TCP   132m
hello-world-gemfire-cluster-server    ClusterIP      None           <none>         40404/TCP,4321/TCP   131m

In your browser, go to the EXTERNAL-IP of the hello-world-deployment.

You should see something similar to this, which represents an artificial time delay simulating a database query.

key: hello

value: 2019-10-01T16:17:51.557 (this will be your current date & time)

time to look up: 3057ms (quantity of time that it took to acquire the key-value pair).

Refresh the page and you should see something similar to

key: hello

value: 2019-10-01T16:17:51.557 (this will be your current date & time)

time to look up: 6ms (quantity of time that it took to acquire the key-value pair).

Note that the time to look up has been significantly reduced. This represents the app getting the information from the cache, Tanzu GemFire, instead of querying the database.

8. Confirm that the Hello, World! App is connected

If you would like to confirm that your Bike Incident app is actually connected to your Tanzu GemFire cluster you can connect through the Tanzu GemFire / Apache Geode shell - commonly referred to as gfsh

In a terminal

  • Start gfsh for kubernetes

    kubectl -n tanzu-gemfire exec -it GEMFIRE-CLUSTER-NAME-locator-0 -- gfsh
    
    • Replace tanzu-gemfire with the name of your namespace, if it’s different.
    • Replace GEMFIRE-CLUSTER-NAME with the name of your Tanzu GemFire cluster.
  • Once you see that GFSH has started, connect to your cluster with the connect command

    gfsh> connect
    
  • Once connected run the list regions command

    gfsh> list regions
    

You should see something similar to

  List of regions
  ------------------
  Hello
  • Confirm the web page timestamp has the same value as that stored in your Hello region. Run the gfsh command

    get --key hello --region=/Hello

You should see something similar to this, where the “Value” listed in your terminal should match the “value” shown on the web page.

Response from the gfsh command

 Result      : true
 Key Class   : java.lang.String
 Key         : hello
 Value Class : java.lang.String
 Value       : "2020-12-08T13:46:47.322"

Shown on the Webpage

 key: hello
 value: 2020-12-08T13:46:47.322
 time to look up: 2ms

Congratulations! You’re ready to start using Tanzu GemFire.


Delete the Hello, World! app

To delete the Hello, World! app you will need to delete the deployment and the service.

This will remove the Hello, World! deployment, replicaset, and pod.

kubectl -n tanzu-gemfire delete deployment hello-world-deployment

This will remove the Hello, World! service.

kubectl -n tanzu-gemfire delete service hello-world-deployment

Delete the Tanzu GemFire Cluster

If you need to delete your Tanzu GemFire cluster, first remove the cluster

kubectl -n tanzu-gemfire delete GemFireCluster hello-world-gemfire-cluster
  • Replace tanzu-gemfire with your namespace if different.
  • Replace hello-world-gemfire-cluster with the name of your GemFire instance if different.

When the Tanzu GemFire cluster has been completely deleted, remove the persistent volume claims of the Kubernetes cluster. These are disk claims that Kubernetes makes on the underlying system.

 kubectl -n tanzu-gemfire get persistentvolumeclaims
  • Replace tanzu-gemfire with your namespace if different.

Then delete each persistent volume claim listed.

 kubectl -n tanzu-gemfire delete persistentvolumeclaim PVC_NAME_1 PVC_NAME_2 PVC_NAME_3 ...
  • Replace tanzu-gemfire with your namespace if different.
  • Replace PVC_NAME_1 PVC_NAME_2 PVC_NAME_3 with each persistent volume claim listed.

Learn More

Now that you have successfully created a running Tanzu GemFire cluster on Kubernetes, check out some other guides.

  • You can get started by implementing the cache-aside pattern which will improve the read performance of your application.

  • Create an application that utilizes Spring Boot for Apache Geode and Spring Session for session state caching.